Adoption application

When is a good time to apply for adoption?

If you are ready to accept a homeless cocker as a potential new & permanent family member.

  • If you are ready financially

  • If EVERYONE in the home are all in agreement with the adoption of a cocker spaniel

  • If your home life is stable

  • If you will be keeping the cocker, even if your living situation, job or relationship status changes

  • If your schedule will not be taking you away from the cocker during the acclimation time (but work is ok)

  • If you can commit to the process of adoption (reference checks, home inspection, adoption fee, acclimation & legal contractual agreements that follow with a successful adoption)

  • If you understand the cocker may have some setbacks when acclimating to your home, & you are willing to work through these with your adoption counselor

  • If you want to add a cocker to your family, and keep the cocker healthy & happy, warm and indoors 100% of the time

 

When is not a good time to apply for adoption?

If you want to adopt, but are experiencing these types of difficulties or significant life changes, or expect these changes in the near future, you should rethink applying at this time.

  • Applying to adopt to use the cocker as a “gift”

  • If you think adopting a dog will help teach a child responsibility

  • If you are getting a cocker because a child "wants it"

  • Impending move or change in living situation, or any type of unstable living conditions

  • Relationship difficulties, personal strife between you and your significant other

  • If you are dependent upon another for your financial care

  • If you are currently surviving on child &/or spousal support as your major source of income

  • If you are a full-time student or will be a full-time student

  • If you are surviving with the help of student loans

  • Any violence in the home situation (either physical and/or mental)

  • The impending change in employment, schedules or vacations

  • When other adults in the home are NOT in agreement with the adoption

  • If you travel frequently where you cannot take your pet

  • If having a child in the future would affect you're keeping a cocker in any way

  • If you are not ready to devote significant time, effort and finances into the care and upkeep of your cocker

  • If you are adopting a dog help you “feel better” due to any of life’s stressors mentioned above

  • If you are adopting a cocker because “they are cute”

  • If you would have any difficulties, at any time, paying for heartworm & flea prevention, vaccinations, wellness checkups and sick vet visits (minor or catastrophic), license fees & frequent grooming needs of a cocker (as these will be contractually required for you to perform after adoption)

  • If you believe in home vaccinations for your dogs

  • If you believe in physical punishment in any form

  • If you are unwilling to keep the cocker on heartworm prevention year-round

  • If you have ANY doubts about adoption after a recent loss of a pet

  • If you want to apply to adopt a dog because they “look like” a deceased pet

  • If you plan on leaving the cocker outside for any length of time (dog house, attached or detached garage, shed, kennel, or tied out in the yard, or leave outside in the fenced yard

 

How much does adoption cost?

 

(Probably the biggest question that gets asked) Typical adoption donation fees go by age. General adoption fees are as follows:

0 – 6 months = $350

6 months - 2 years old = $250

2 - 7 years old =$200

8 years & above = $150

(* These fees are typical and subject to change. *)

 

Can I make payments?

 

Absolutely NOT! Adopting and caring for an animal is a commitment, and should not be entered into without the resources to do so. If you need to make payments on a $200 adoption donation, which covers all the necessary vetting, how would you handle an emergency vet bill of $500? Or a sick visit with a vet bill of $250 - $300. Adoption donations are non-negotiable.

 

How do you pay for all these expenses that the adoption fees don’t cover?

 

Columbus Cocker Rescue is a 501(c)(3) fully non~profit charitable organization that relies solely on volunteers & donations.  We are NOT a shelter, and we do NOT get any federal funds. 

 

We have fundraisers throughout the year; we get donations from individuals, take donations at events we attend, and apply for some small grants when they are available.  Donations are fully tax deductible.  Without donations, we can not do the life saving work to save these cockers in need.

 

What if I adopt a cocker and it doesn’t work out, do we just lose our adoption fee?

 

If you are approved to adopt and select a cocker, you will sign a legally binding contract and pay the adoption donation when you take possession of the cocker & begin the home trial period. 

 

Columbus Cocker Rescue will not cash any adoption donation, until we know that the cocker is not coming back to rescue, because you tell us if/when they have found their forever home.  The standard home trial is 1 – 2 weeks where we keep in close contact with the adopter to monitor the progress of the placement.   At some point during the home trial, and at least by the end the two weeks, if the adopter relays to us that the cocker is a good fit and has a permanent home, the donation can be cashed/deposited, and will no longer be refundable.  If the cocker does not work out during the home trial period, & the adopter does not wish to pursue adoption, the donation is refunded, or the check is returned or destroyed. 

 

Communication between the adopter and the CCR representative is important, and if it is not conveyed by the adopter, to Columbus Cocker Rescue's representative &/or director that there are any problems by the end of the 2 week home trial period, the adoption donation can be deposited and nonrefundable.  Any special circumstances are only approved by the Director if there has been prior notification of any problems and deemed warranted by the director.  So, with good communication, there is no risk on losing the adoption donation, as a cocker finding a loving home is the main goal, not cashing a check.

 

Can I come to see your facility?

 

Unfortunately, we are not a shelter and do not have a central location for housing the cockers.  Our cockers are either in temporary emergency boarding or housed in individual private foster homes in and around the Columbus Ohio area.  Our CCR volunteers do most of their work from their own homes, communicating via phone & email with each other, to potential adopters & arranging events.

 

How long does adoption take?

 

After you submit an application, the approval process takes as long as it takes.  Some times we can pull it off in 24 hours if everything is working to our benefit, other times it can take a few weeks.  On average, a typical timeframe for application approval can range from 2 – 3 days, to about 7 – 10 days. This depends highly upon the accuracy of the information provided by the applicant.  If any information is missing, omitted, false, not forthcoming, directions not followed or not completed, this will delay the process.

 

What is the application process?

 

Our volunteers & adoption advisors first review the application, send out an email that we have received the application usually within 24 hours.  Then we check historical vet histories on any/all current & past pets of the applicant, either living or deceased. 

*** Until the vet check is completed,, we will not progress to the next step. ***

 

Then we also check two, nonfamily, personal references, followed by a home visit before we place a cocker in the approved applicant’s care.

 

I’ve heard that Cockers can be mean and have behavioral problems, but I’ve also heard they have a great temperament and are great family dogs. Which one is more true?

 

All and none!  How’s that for an answer?  Cockers' behavior is individual, just like people.  Their traits and behaviors vary from one cocker to another.  Some things they do have in common: 

 

1) They NEVER do well as an outdoor dog, NEVER, they require & crave to be part of a family, in a home with human contact too much.  Their skin & coat deteriorate outdoors, and they strive to get attention and get lonely.

2) They usually always want their loving human around them.  Cockers are usually people-oriented dogs, and they do well with people, or at least the people they have grown to love and trust. 

3) All cockers are different, one may have issues with resource guarding, while another you can do anything to and they won’t get upset.

 

A good rule of thumb, if you are looking for a cocker, keep your mind open, and stock up on consistency in training and gentle guidance.  If your heart, home & finances are willing, your mind is open, your situation stable and your adoption plans consistent & strong, then there is most likely a good match we can make for you with a rescued American Cocker Spaniel.

 

Please remember, our FIRST priority is our cocker kids we’ve saved.  We’ve made a promise to them, a commitment, and we will uphold that promise by all means at our disposal.